Publications

 
Google Scholar metrics (01 Dec, 2021): works: 29, citations: 237, h-index: 9

Peer Reviewed

2021

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  journal
    @article{Holthaus2021a,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Wachsmuth, Sven",
        title = "{It was a Pleasure Meeting You - Towards a Holistic Model of Human-Robot Encounters}",
        journal = "International Journal of Social Robotics",
        issn = "1875-4805",
        year = "2021",
        volume = "13",
        number = "7",
        pages = "1729–1745",
        abstract = "Social signals are commonly used to facilitate the usability of humanoid robots. While providing the robot with an extended expressibility, these signals are often applied only in structured interactions where parts of the familiarization or farewell processes are disregarded in the evaluation. In order to establish the consideration of a more comprehensive view, this article presents a holistic model of human encounters with a social robot. We propose and discuss particular robot signals, which aim to express the robot's social awareness, for each of the model's phases. We present an interaction study with humans that are inexperienced in interacting with robots to investigate the effects of these signals. Results verify that the implementation of proposed signals is beneficial for the participants' user experience. The study further reveals a strong interdependency of a robot's social signals and the importance of addressing entire encounters in human-robot interaction studies.",
        doi = "10.1007/s12369-021-00759-9"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  open    journal
    @article{Schulz2021,
        author = "Schulz, Trenton and Soma, Rebekka and Holthaus, Patrick",
        title = "{Movement Acts in Breakdown Situations - How a Robot's Recovery Procedure Affects Participants' Opinions}",
        journal = "Paladyn, Journal of Behavioral Robotics: Special Issue Trust, Acceptance and Social Cues in Robot Interaction",
        year = "2021",
        number = "1",
        volume = "12",
        pages = "336--355",
        abstract = "Recovery procedures are targeted at correcting issues encountered by robots. What are people's opinions of a robot during these recovery procedures? During an experiment that examined how a mobile robot moved, the robot would unexpectedly pause or rotate itself to recover from a navigation problem. The serendipity of the recovery procedure and people's understanding of it became a case study to examine how future study designs could consider breakdowns better and look at suggestions for better robot behaviors in such situations. We present the original experiment with the recovery procedure. We then examine the responses from the participants in this experiment qualitatively to see how they interpreted the breakdown situation when it occurred. Responses could be grouped into themes of sentience, competence, and the robot's forms. The themes indicate that the robot's movement communicated different information to different participants. This leads us to introduce the concept of movement acts to help examine the explicit and implicit parts of communication in movement. Given that we developed the concept looking at an unexpected breakdown, we suggest that researchers should plan for the possibility of breakdowns in experiments and examine and report people's experience around a robot breakdown to further explore unintended robot communication.",
        doi = "10.1515/pjbr-2021-0027"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  open
    @inproceedings{BamorovatAbadi2021a,
        author = "Bamorovat Abadi, Mohammad Hossein and Shahabian Alashti, Mohamad Reza and Holthaus, Patrick and Menon, Catherine and Amirabdollahian, Farshid",
        title = "Affordable Robot Mapping using Omnidirectional Vision",
        booktitle = "Proceedings of the 4th UK-RAS Conference: Robotics at Home (\\#UKRAS21)",
        address = "Hatfield, UK",
        year = "2021",
        abstract = "Mapping is a fundamental requirement for robot navigation. In this paper, we introduce a novel visual mapping method that relies solely on a single omnidirectional camera. We present a metric that allows us to generate a map from the input image by using a visual Sonar approach. The combination of the visual sonars with the robot's odometry enables us to determine a relation equation and subsequently generate a map that is suitable for robot navigation. Results based on visual map comparison indicate that our approach is comparable with the established solutions based on RGB-D cameras or laser-based sensors. We now embark on evaluating our accuracy against the established methods.",
        pages = "29--30",
        doi = "10.31256/If7Nm5Z"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  open
    @inproceedings{BamorovatAbadi2021b,
        author = "Bamorovat Abadi, Mohammad Hossein and Shahabian Alashti, Mohamad Reza and Holthaus, Patrick and Menon, Catherine and Amirabdollahian, Farshid",
        title = "Robot House Human Activity Recognition Dataset",
        booktitle = "Proceedings of the 4th UK-RAS Conference: Robotics at Home (\\#UKRAS21)",
        address = "Hatfield, UK",
        year = "2021",
        abstract = "Human activity recognition is one of the most challenging tasks in computer vision. State-of-the art approaches such as deep learning techniques thereby often rely on large labelled datasets of human activities. However, currently available datasets are suboptimal for learning human activities in companion robotics scenarios at home, for example, missing crucial perspectives. With this as a consideration, we present the University of Hertfordshire Robot House Human Activity Recognition Dataset (RH-HAR-1). It contains RGB videos of a human engaging in daily activities, taken from four different cameras. Importantly, this dataset contains two non-standard perspectives: a ceiling-mounted fisheye camera and a mobile robot's view. In the first instance, RH-HAR-1 covers five daily activities with a total of more than 10,000 videos.",
        pages = "19--20",
        doi = "10.31256/Bw7Kt2N"
    }
    
    
  •  URL  Preprint  BibTeX  workshop    open
    @inproceedings{Holthaus2021c,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick",
        title = "How does a robot's social credibility relate to its perceived trustworthiness?",
        booktitle = "RO-MAN 2021 Workshop on Trust, Acceptance and Social Cues in Human-Robot Interaction - SCRITA",
        year = "2021",
        abstract = "This position paper aims to highlight and discuss the role of a robot's social credibility in interaction with humans. In particular, I want to explore a potential relation between social credibility and a robot's acceptability and ultimately its trustworthiness. I thereby also review and expand the notion of social credibility as a measure of how well the robot obeys social norms during interaction with the concept of conscious acknowledgement.",
        url = "https://arxiv.org/abs/2107.08805"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  open
    @inproceedings{ShahabianAlashti2021,
        author = "Shahabian Alashti, Mohamad Reza and Bamorovat Abadi, Mohammad Hossein and Holthaus, Patrick and Menon, Catherine and Amirabdollahian, Farshid",
        title = "Human activity recognition in RoboCup@home: Inspiration from online benchmarks",
        booktitle = "Proceedings of the 4th UK-RAS Conference: Robotics at Home (\\#UKRAS21)",
        address = "Hatfield, UK",
        year = "2021",
        abstract = "Human activity recognition is an important aspect of many robotics applications. In this paper, we discuss how well the RoboCup@home competition accounts for the importance of such recognition algorithms. Using public benchmarks as an inspiration, we propose to add a new task that specifically tests the performance of human activity recognition in this league. We suggest that human-robot interaction research in general can benefit from the addition of such a task as RoboCup@home is considered to accelerate, regulate, and consolidate the field.",
        pages = "27--28",
        doi = "10.31256/Os6Aw4Y"
    }
    
    

2020

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @incollection{Rossi2020,
        author = "Rossi, Alessandra and Dautenhahn, Kerstin and Koay, Kheng Lee and Walters, Michael L. and Holthaus, Patrick",
        editor = "Wagner, Alan R. and Feil-Seifer, David and Haring, Kerstin S. and Rossi, Silvia and Williams, Thomas and He, Hongsheng and Ge, Shuzhi Sam",
        title = "{Evaluating people's perceptions of trust in a robot in a repeated interactions study}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Social Robotics (ICSR 2020)",
        address = "Golden, Colorado",
        series = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science",
        year = "2020",
        volume = "12483",
        publisher = "Springer Cham",
        abstract = "Trust has been established to be a key factor in fostering human-robot interactions. However, trust can change overtime according different factors, including a breach of trust due to a robot's error. In this study, we observed people's interactions with a companion robot in a real house adapted for human-robot interaction experimentation over three weeks. The interactions happened in six day-scenarios in which a robot performed different tasks under two different conditions. Each condition included fourteen tasks performed by the robot, either correctly, or with errors with severe consequences on the first or last day of interaction. At the end of each experimental condition, participants were presented with an emergency scenario to evaluate their trust in the robot. We evaluated participants' trust in the robot by observing their decision to trust the robot during the emergency scenario, and by collecting their consideration through questionnaires. We concluded that there is a correlation between the timing of an error with severe consequences performed by the robot and the corresponding loss of trust of the human in the robot. In particular, people's trust is subjected to the initial mental formation.",
        doi = "10.1007/978-3-030-62056-1\_38",
        isbn = "978-3-030-62056-1"
    }
    
    

2019

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @incollection{Holthaus2019,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Menon, Catherine and Amirabdollahian, Farshid",
        editor = "Salichs, Miguel A. and Ge, Shuzhi Sam and Barakova, Emilia Ivanova and Cabibihan, John-John and Wagner, Alan R. and Castro-Gonz{\'a}lez, {\'A}lvaro and He, Hongsheng",
        title = "{How a Robot's Social Credibility Affects Safety Performance}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Social Robotics (ICSR 2019)",
        address = "Madrid, Spain",
        series = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science",
        year = "2019",
        publisher = "Springer Cham",
        pages = "740--749",
        abstract = "This paper connects the two domains of HRI (Human-Robot Interaction) and safety engineering to ensure that the design of interactive robots considers an effect of social behaviours on safety functionality. We conducted a preliminary user study with a social robot that alerts participants during a puzzle-solving task to an environmental hazard. Our study findings show an indicative trend that users who were interrupted by a socially credible robot are more likely to act and mitigate the hazard than users interrupted by a robot lacking social credibility.",
        doi = "10.1007/978-3-030-35888-4\_69",
        isbn = "978-3-030-35888-4",
        volume = "11876"
    }
    
    
  •  URL  Preprint  BibTeX  open
    @inproceedings{Menon2019a,
        author = "Menon, Catherine and Holthaus, Patrick",
        title = "{Does a Loss of Social Credibility Impact Robot Safety? Balancing social and safety behaviours of assistive robots}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Performance, Safety and Robustness in Complex Systems and Applications (PESARO 2019)",
        address = "Valencia, Spain",
        year = "2019",
        pages = "18--24",
        publisher = "IARIA",
        abstract = "This position paper discusses the safety-related functions performed by assistive robots and explores the re-lationship between trust and effective safety risk mitigation. We identify a measure of the robot’s social effectiveness, termed social credibility, and present a discussion of how social credibility may be gained and lost. This paper’s contribution is the identification of a link between social credibility and safety-related performance. Accordingly, we draw on analyses of existing systems to demonstrate how an assistive robot’s safety-critical functionality can be impaired by a loss of social credibility. In addition, we present a discussion of some of the consequences of prioritising either safety-related functionality or social engagement. We propose the identification of a mixed-criticality scheduling algorithm in order to maximise both safety-related performance and social engagement.",
        isbn = "978-1-61208-698-9",
        url = "https://www.thinkmind.org/index.php?view=article\&articleid=pesaro\_2019\_2\_10\_60021"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Schulz2019b,
        author = "Schulz, Trenton and Holthaus, Patrick and Amirabdollahian, Farshid and Koay, Kheng Lee",
        title = "{Humans' Perception of a Robot Moving Using a Slow in and Slow Out Velocity Profile}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2019)",
        address = "Daegu, South Korea",
        year = "2019",
        pages = "594-595",
        publisher = "ACM/IEEE",
        abstract = "Humans need to understand and trust the robots they are working with. We hypothesize that how a robot moves can impact people’s perception and their trust. We present a methodology for a study to explore people’s perception of a robot using the animation principle of slow in, slow out—to change the robot’s velocity profile versus a robot moving using a linear velocity profile. Study participants will interact with the robot within a home context to complete a task while the robot moves around the house. The participants’ perceptions of the robot will be recorded using the Godspeed Questionnaire. A pilot study shows that it is possible to notice the difference between the linear and the slow in, slow out velocity profiles, so the full experiment planned with participants will allow us to compare their perceptions based on the two observable behaviors.",
        doi = "10.1109/HRI.2019.8673239"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  URL  Preprint  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Schulz2019a,
        author = "Schulz, Trenton and Holthaus, Patrick and Amirabdollahian, Farshid and Koay, Kheng Lee and Torresen, Jim and Herstad, Jo",
        title = "{Differences of Human Perceptions of a Robot Moving using Linear or Slow in, Slow out Velocity Profiles When Performing a Cleaning Task}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2019)",
        address = "New Delhi, India",
        year = "2019",
        publisher = "IEEE",
        abstract = "We investigated how a robot moving with different velocity profiles affects a person’s perception of it when working together on a task. The two profiles are the standard linear profile and a profile based on the animation principles of slow in, slow out. The investigation was accomplished by running an experiment in a home context where people and the robot cooperated on a clean-up task. We used the Godspeed series of questionnaires to gather people’s perception of the robot. Average scores for each series appear not to be different enough to reject the null hypotheses, but looking at the component items provides paths to future areas of research. We also discuss the scenario for the experiment and how it may be used for future research into using animation techniques for moving robots and improving the legibility of a robot’s locomotion.",
        doi = "10.1109/RO-MAN46459.2019.8956355",
        issn = "1944-9445",
        url = "https://www.dropbox.com/sh/6ok7yp1ouhmhoji/AAC60Yp7l9Ol\_hy8ia5LMOExa/papers?dl=0\&subfolder\_nav\_tracking=1"
    }
    
    
  •  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Schulz2019c,
        author = "Schulz, Trenton and Holthaus, Patrick",
        title = "{Moving Robots Using the Slow in and Slow out Animation Principle}",
        booktitle = "HRI 2019 Workshop on Expressivity for Sustained Human-Robot Interaction",
        address = "Daegu, South Korea",
        year = "2019",
        abstract = "This extended abstract discusses the work done to move robots using the slow in, slow out animation principle and the set up for an experiment that has recently been completed. Results are still being analyzed."
    }
    
    
  •  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Schulz2019d,
        author = "Schulz, Trenton and Soma, Rebekka and Holthaus, Patrick",
        title = "Stuck on You: How a Stuck Robot Affects Participants' Opinions",
        booktitle = "RO-MAN 2019 Workshop on Trust, Acceptance and Social Cues in Robot Interaction - SCRITA",
        address = "New Delhi, India",
        year = "2019",
        abstract = "We examine some of the qualitative aspects of an experiment that examined people's perception of a robot based on a change of its motion. Specifically, we look at people's qualitative opinions when the robot gets “stuck” while navigating and corrects itself. This extended abstract presents preliminary results and themes that we wish to examine."
    }
    
    

2018

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Rossi2018a,
        author = "Rossi, Alessandra and Holthaus, Patrick and Dautenhahn, Kerstin and Koay, Kheng Lee and Walters, Michael L.",
        title = "{Getting to know Pepper: Effects of people's awareness of a robot's capabilities on their trust in the robot}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction (HAI 2018)",
        pages = "246--252",
        address = "Southampton, UK",
        year = "2018",
        publisher = "ACM",
        doi = "10.1145/3284432.3284464",
        abstract = "This work investigates how human awareness about a social robot's capabilities is related to trusting this robot to handle different tasks. We present a user study that relates knowledge on different quality levels to participant's ratings of trust. Secondary school pupils were asked to rate their trust in the robot after three types of exposures: a video demonstration, a live interaction, and a programming task. The study revealed that the pupils' trust is positively affected across different domains after each session, indicating that human users trust a robot more the more awareness about the robot they have."
    }
    
    
  •  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Rossi2018b,
        author = "Rossi, Alessandra and Holthaus, Patrick and Dautenhahn, Kerstin and Koay, Kheng Lee and Walters, Michael L.",
        title = "Programming Pepper: What can you make a humanoid robot do?",
        booktitle = "3rd Workshop on Behavior Adaptation, Interaction and Learning for Assistive Robotics (BAILAR 2018)",
        address = "Nanjing, China",
        year = "2018",
        abstract = "The UK Robotics Week provided an opportunity to engage the UK nation’s schools, colleges and universities in developing skills needed to drive the UK’s technological future economy. Within this contest we decided to present a series of events to introduce school children to the state-of-art of social Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) and some currently adopted social cues. The students were exposed to three different types of HRI: a video HRI, a real live HRI and HRI programming of a robot. In particular, during the programming sessions, students were focused on the implementation of emotions in HRI. Future works will use the results collected during this event to investigate the impact of human perceptions of trust and acceptability of robots in Human-Robot Interactions."
    }
    
    

2017

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  journal
    @article{Wrede2017,
        author = "Wrede, Sebastian and Leichsenring, Christian and Holthaus, Patrick and Hermann, Thomas and Wachsmuth, Sven",
        title = "{The Cognitive Service Robotics Apartment - A Versatile Environment for Human-Machine Interaction Research}",
        journal = "KI - Künstliche Intelligenz: Special Issue on Smart Environments",
        year = "2017",
        volume = "31",
        number = "3",
        pages = "299--304",
        doi = "10.1007/s13218-017-0492-x",
        abstract = "The emergence of cognitive interaction technology offering intuitive and personalized support for humans in daily routines is essential for the success of future smart environments. Social robotics and ambient assisted living are well-established, active research fields but in the real world the number of smart environments that support humans efficiently on a daily basis is still rather low. We argue that research on ambient intelligence and human-robot interaction needs to be conducted in a a strongly interdisciplinary process to facilitate seamless integration of assistance technologies into the users' daily lives. With the Cognitive Service Robotics Apartment (CSRA), we are developing a novel kind of laboratory following this interdisciplinary approach. It combines a smart home with ambient intelligence functionalities with a cognitive social robot with advanced manipulation capabilities to explore the all day use of cognitive interaction technology for human assistance. This lab in conjunction with our development approach opens up new lines of inquiry and allows to address new research questions in human machine, -agent and -robot interaction."
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Michalski2017,
        author = "Michalski, Timo and Pohling, Marian and Holthaus, Patrick",
        title = "{Competitive Agents for Intelligent Home Automation}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction (HAI 2017)",
        address = "Bielefeld, Germany",
        year = "2017",
        pages = "527--531",
        publisher = "ACM",
        doi = "10.1145/3125739.3132616",
        abstract = "Technologies that aim to achieve intelligent automation in smart homes typically involve either trigger-action pairs or machine learning. These, however, are often complex to configure or hard to comprehend for the user. To maximize automation efficiency while keeping the configuration simple and the effects comprehensible, we thus explore an alternative agent-based approach. With the help of a survey, we put together a set of intelligent agents that act autonomously in the environment. Conflicts between behaviors, identified with a secondary study, are thereby resolved with a competitive combination of agents. We finally present the draft of a user interface that allows for individual configuration of all agents."
    }
    
    

2016

  •  DOI  BibTeX
    @incollection{Bernotat2016,
        author = "Bernotat, Jasmin and Schiffhauer, Birte and Eyssel, Friederike and Holthaus, Patrick and Leichsenring, Christian and Richter, Viktor and Pohling, Marian and Carlmeyer, Birte and Engelmann, Kai Frederic and Lier, Florian and Schulz, Simon and Bröhl, Rebecca and Seibel, Elena and Hellwig, Paul and Cimiano, Philipp and Kummert, Franz and Schlangen, David and Wagner, Petra and Hermann, Thomas and Wachsmuth, Sven and Wrede, Britta and Wrede, Sebastian",
        editor = "Agah, Arvin and Cabibihan, John-John and Howard, Ayanna M. and Salichs, Miguel A. and He, Hongsheng",
        title = {{Welcome to the future – How na{\"{i}}ve users intuitively address an intelligent robotics apartment}},
        booktitle = "International Conference on Social Robotics (ICSR 2016)",
        address = "Kansas City, USA",
        series = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science",
        pages = "982--992",
        volume = "9979",
        year = "2016",
        doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-47437-3\_96",
        isbn = "978-3-319-47437-3",
        publisher = "Springer Berlin / Heidelberg",
        abstract = {The purpose of this Wizard-of-Oz study was to explore the intuitive verbal and non-verbal goal-directed behavior of na{\"{i}}ve participants in an intelligent robotics apartment. Participants had to complete seven mundane tasks, for instance, they were asked to turn on the light. Participants were explicitly instructed to consider nonstandard ways of completing the respective tasks. A multi-method approach revealed that most participants favored speech and interfaces like switches and screens to communicate with the intelligent robotics apartment. However, they required instructions to use the interfaces in order to perceive them as competent targets for human-machine interaction. Hence, first important steps were taken to investigate how to design an intelligent robotics apartment in a user-centered and user-friendly manner.}
    }
    
    
  •  URL  BibTeX  open
    @inproceedings{Engelmann2016,
        author = "Engelmann, Kai-Frederic and Holthaus, Patrick and Wrede, Sebastian and Wrede, Britta",
        title = "{An Interaction-Centric Dataset for Learning Automation Rules in Smart Homes}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2016)",
        address = "Portorož, Slovenia",
        year = "2016",
        publisher = "European Language Resources Association (ELRA)",
        isbn = "978-2-9517408-9-1",
        url = "http://www.lrec-conf.org/proceedings/lrec2016/summaries/1014.html",
        abstract = "The term smart home refers to a living environment that by its connected sensors and actuators is capable of providing intelligent and contextualised support to its user. This may result in automated behaviors that blends into the user’s daily life. However, currently most smart homes do not provide such intelligent support. A first step towards such intelligent capabilities lies in learning automation rules by observing the user’s behavior. We present a new type of corpus for learning such rules from user behavior as observed from the events in a smart homes sensor and actuator network. The data contains information about intended tasks by the users and synchronized events from this network. It is derived from interactions of 59 users with the smart home in order to solve five tasks. The corpus contains recordings of more than 40 different types of data streams and has been segmented and pre-processed to increase signal quality. Overall, the data shows a high noise level on specific data types that can be filtered out by a simple smoothing approach. The resulting data provides insights into event patterns resulting from task specific user behavior and thus constitutes a basis for machine learning approaches to learn automation rules."
    }
    
    
  •  URL  BibTeX  open
    @inproceedings{Holthaus2016a,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Leichsenring, Christian and Bernotat, Jasmin and Richter, Viktor and Pohling, Marian and Carlmeyer, Birte and Köster, Norman and zu Borgsen, Sebastian Meyer and Zorn, René and Schiffhauer, Birte and Engelmann, Kai Frederic and Lier, Florian and Schulz, Simon and Cimiano, Philipp and Eyssel, Friederike and Herrmann, Thomas and Kummert, Franz and Schlangen, David and Wachsmuth, Sven and Wagner, Petra and Wrede, Britta and Wrede, Sebastian",
        title = "{How to Address Smart Homes with a Social Robot? A Multi-modal Corpus of User Interactions with an Intelligent Environment}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2016)",
        address = "Portorož, Slovenia",
        year = "2016",
        publisher = "European Language Resources Association (ELRA)",
        isbn = "978-2-9517408-9-1",
        url = "http://www.lrec-conf.org/proceedings/lrec2016/summaries/1046.html",
        abstract = "In order to explore intuitive verbal and non-verbal interfaces in smart environments we recorded user interactions with an intelligent apartment. Besides offering various interactive capabilities itself, the apartment is also inhabited by a social robot that is available as a humanoid interface. This paper presents a multi-modal corpus that contains goal-directed actions of naive users in attempts to solve a number of predefined tasks. Alongside audio and video recordings, our data-set consists of large amount of temporally aligned sensory data and system behavior provided by the environment and its interactive components. Non-verbal system responses such as changes in light or display contents, as well as robot and apartment utterances and gestures serve as a rich basis for later in-depth analysis. Manual annotations provide further information about meta data like the current course of study and user behavior including the incorporated modality, all literal utterances, language features, emotional expressions, foci of attention, and addressees."
    }
    
    

2014

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Holthaus2014a,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Wachsmuth, Sven",
        title = "{The Receptionist Robot}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2014)",
        address = "Bielefeld, Germany",
        year = "2014",
        pages = "329--329",
        publisher = "ACM/IEEE",
        doi = "10.1145/2559636.2559784",
        abstract = "In this demonstration, a humanoid robot interacts with an interlocutor through speech and gestures in order to give directions on a map. The interaction is specifically designed to provide an enhanced user experience by being aware of non-verbal social signals. Therefore, we take spatial communicative cues into account and to react to them accordingly."
    }
    
    
  •  URL  BibTeX  open    thesis
    @phdthesis{Holthaus2014b,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick",
        school = "Bielefeld University",
        title = "{Approaching Human-Like Spatial Awareness in Social Robotics - An Investigation of Spatial Interaction Strategies with a Receptionist Robot}",
        type = "PhD Thesis",
        year = "2014",
        url = "https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2733038",
        abstract = "This doctoral thesis investigates the influence of social signals in the spatial domain that aim to raise a robot’s awareness towards its human interlocutor. A concept of spatial awareness thereby extends the robot’s possibilities for expressing its knowledge about the situation as well as its own capabilities. As a result, especially untrained users can build up more appropriate expectations about the current situation which supposedly leads to a minimization of misunderstandings and thereby an enhancement of user experience. On the background of research that investigates communication among humans, relations are drawn in order to utilize gained insights for developing a robot that is capable of acting socially intelligent with regard to human-like treatment of spatial configurations and signals. In a study-driven approach, an integrated concept of spatial awareness is therefore proposed. An important aspect of that concept, which is founded in its spatial extent, lies in its aspiration to cover a holistic encounter between human and robot with the goal to improve user experience from the first sight until the end of reciprocal awareness. It describes how spatial configurations and signals can be perceived and interpreted in a social robot. Furthermore, it also presents signals and behavioral properties for such a robot that target at influencing said configurations and enhancing robot verbosity. In order to approve the concept’s validity in realistic settings, an interactive scenario is presented in the form of a receptionist robot to which it is applied. In the context of this setup, a comprehensive user study is conducted that verifies the implementation of spatial awareness to be beneficial for an interaction with humans that are naive to the subject. Furthermore, the importance of addressing an entire encounter in human-robot interaction is confirmed as well as a strong interdependency of a robot’s social signals among each other."
    }
    
    

2013

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Holthaus2013,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Wachsmuth, Sven",
        title = "{Direct On-Line Imitation of Human Faces with Hierarchical ART Networks}",
        booktitle = "International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2013)",
        address = "Gyeongju, South Korea",
        pages = "370--371",
        year = "2013",
        publisher = "IEEE",
        doi = "10.1109/ROMAN.2013.6628502",
        abstract = "This work-in-progress paper presents an on-line system for robotic heads capable of mimicking humans. The marker-less method solely depends on the interactant’s face as an input and does not use a set of basic emotions and is thus capable of displaying a large variety of facial expressions. A preliminary evaluation assigns solid performance with potential for improvement."
    }
    
    

2012

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Holthaus2012,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Wachsmuth, Sven",
        title = "{Active Peripersonal Space for More Intuitive HRI}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Humanoid Robots (HUMANOIDS 2012)",
        address = "Osaka, Japan",
        pages = "508--513",
        year = "2012",
        publisher = "IEEE-RAS",
        doi = "10.1109/HUMANOIDS.2012.6651567",
        abstract = "In face-to-face interaction, humans coordinate actions in their surroundings with the help of a well structured spatial representation. For example on a dinner table, everybody exactly knows which objects belong to her and where she is allowed to grasp. To have robots, e.g. receptionists, act accordingly, we conducted an on-line survey about the expectations humans have while interacting with such a robot. Results indicate that humans attribute the robot handedness and an awareness of distance and territoriality in its own peripersonal space. In order to align a robot's behavior to these expectations, we have have developed a first spatial representation of the robots peripersonal space."
    }
    
    

2011

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  journal
    @article{Holthaus2011,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Pitsch, Karola and Wachsmuth, Sven",
        title = "{How Can I Help? - Spatial Attention Strategies for a Receptionist Robot}",
        journal = "International Journal of Social Robotics",
        year = "2011",
        volume = "3",
        number = "4",
        pages = "383--393",
        doi = "10.1007/s12369-011-0108-9",
        issn = "1875-4791",
        abstract = "Social interaction between humans takes place in the spatial environment on a daily basis. We occupy space for ourselves and respect the dynamics of spaces that are occupied by others. In human-robot interaction, spatial models are commonly used for structuring relatively far-away interactions or passing-by scenarios. This work instead, focuses on the transition between distant and close communication for an interaction opening. We applied a spatial model to a humanoid robot and implemented an attention system that is connected to it. The resulting behaviors have been verified in an online video study. The questionnaire revealed that these behaviors are applicable and result in a robot that has been perceived as more interested in the human and shows its attention and intentions earlier and to a higher degree than other strategies."
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Hegel2011,
        author = "Hegel, Frank and Gieselmann, Sebastian and Peters, Annika and Holthaus, Patrick and Wrede, Britta",
        title = "{Towards a Typology of Meaningful Signals and Cues in Social Robotics}",
        booktitle = "International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2011)",
        address = "Atlanta, Georgia",
        year = "2011",
        pages = "72--78",
        publisher = "IEEE",
        doi = "10.1109/ROMAN.2011.6005246",
        abstract = "In this paper, we present a first step towards a typology of relevant signals and cues in human-robot interaction (HRI). In human as well as in animal communication systems, signals and cues play an important role for senders and receivers of such signs. In our typology, we systematically distinguish between a robot's signals and cues which are either designed to be human-like or artificial to create meaningful information. Subsequently, developers and designers should be aware of which signs affect a user's judgements on social robots. For this reason, we first review several signals and cues that have already been successfully used in HRI with regard to our typology. Second, we discuss crucial human-like and artificial cues which have so far not been considered in the design of social robots - although they are highly likely to affect a user's judgement of social robots."
    }
    
    

2010

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX
    @incollection{Holthaus2010,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Lütkebohle, Ingo and Hanheide, Marc and Wachsmuth, Sven",
        editor = "Ge, Shuzhi and Li, Haizhou and Cabibihan, John-John and Tan, Yeow",
        title = "{Can I Help You? A Spatial Attention System for a Receptionist Robot}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Social Robotics (ICSR 2010)",
        address = "Singapore",
        series = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science",
        pages = "325--334",
        volume = "6414",
        year = "2010",
        doi = "10.1007/978-3-642-17248-9\_34",
        isbn = "978-3-642-17247-2",
        publisher = "Springer Berlin / Heidelberg",
        abstract = "Social interaction between humans takes place in the spatial dimension on a daily basis. We occupy space for ourselves and respect the dynamics of spaces that are occupied by others. In human-robot interaction, the focus has been on other topics so far. Therefore, this work applies a spatial model to a humanoid robot and implements an attention system that is connected to it. The resulting behaviors have been verified in an on-line video study. The questionnaire revealed that these behaviors are applicable and result in a robot that has been perceived as more interested in the human and shows its attention and intentions to a higher degree."
    }
    
    

Others

  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  open    welcome
    @inproceedings{Holthaus2021b,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Amirabdollahian, Farshid and Asher, Claire and Richards, Arthur",
        title = "{\\#UKRAS21: The 4th UK Robotics and Autonomous Systems Conference}",
        booktitle = "Proceedings of the 4th UK-RAS Conference: Robotics at Home (\\#UKRAS21)",
        address = "Hatfield, UK",
        year = "2021",
        pages = "1--2",
        doi = "10.31256/Ft3Ex7U"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  BibTeX  editorial
    @article{Rossi2021,
        author = "Rossi, Alessandra and Holthaus, Patrick and Perugia, Giulia and Moros, Sílvia and Scheunemann, Marcus",
        title = "{Trust, Acceptance and Social Cues in Human–Robot Interaction (SCRITA)}",
        journal = "International Journal of Social Robotics",
        year = "2021",
        doi = "10.1007/s12369-021-00844-z",
        publisher = "Springer Nature"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  BibTeX  editorial
    @book{Rossi2019,
        editor = "Rossi, Alessandra and Koay, Kheng Lee and Moros, Silvia and Holthaus, Patrick and Scheunemann, Marcus",
        title = "{Special issue of Interaction Studies: Social Cues in Robot Interaction, Trust and Acceptance}",
        year = "2019",
        volume = "20(3)",
        doi = "10.1075/is.20.3",
        publisher = "John Benjamins Publishing Company"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  report
    @article{Holthaus2016c,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick",
        title = "{Community News: Conference Report LREC 2016}",
        journal = "KI - Künstliche Intelligenz",
        year = "2016",
        volume = "30",
        number = "3",
        pages = "349--354",
        issn = "1610-1987",
        doi = "10.1007/s13218-016-0447-7"
    }
    
    
  •  DOI  Preprint  BibTeX  summary
    @inproceedings{Holthaus2016b,
        author = "Holthaus, Patrick and Hermann, Thomas and Wrede, Sebastian and Wachsmuth, Sven and Wrede, Britta",
        title = "{1st International Workshop on Embodied Interaction with Smart Environments (Workshop Summary)}",
        booktitle = "International Conference on Multimodal Interaction (ICMI 2016)",
        address = "Tokyo, Japan",
        year = "2016",
        publisher = "ACM",
        doi = "10.1145/2993148.3007628",
        abstract = "The first workshop on embodied interaction with smart environments aims to bring together the very active community of multi-modal interaction research and the rapidly evolving field of smart home technologies. Besides addressing the software architecture of such very complex systems, it puts an emphasis on questions regarding an intuitive interaction with the environment. Thereby, especially the role of agency leads to interesting challenges in the light of user interactions. We therefore encourage a lively discussion on the design and concepts of social robots and virtual avatars as well as innovative ambient devices and their implementation into smart environments."
    }